What people said about leejohnson’s jam It Don't Come Easy

9 Comments (since 10 Jul 2014)

7 years, 4 months ago

leejohnson

"It Don't Come Easy", backed with "Early 1970", was released on April 9th 1971 in the UK, and a week later in the USA. It peaked at No. 4 on the US Billboard chart, and also got to No. 4 in the UK. The single would later beat the sales of Starr's fellow ex-Beatles' singles at the time: John Lennon's "Power to the People", Paul McCartney's "Another Day" and George Harrison's "Bangla Desh".

7 years, 4 months ago

leejohnson

Although technically being written by George Harrison, the only official songwriting credit went to "Richard Starkey" - Ringo's real name. A demo version exists with George Harrison providing a guide vocal for Starr.

7 years, 4 months ago

leejohnson

The final released version was produced by Harrison and published by Startling Music, and included Harrison on guitar, Klaus Voormann on bass guitar, Stephen Stills on piano, Ron Cattermole on saxophone and trumpet, 'Badfinger' members Pete Ham and Tom Evans on background vocals, and Starr on drums and lead vocals. The lyrics refer to the Beatles' lives around the time of their breakup (hence the title). Starr performed this song at the Concert for Bangladesh (forgetting some of the words!).

7 years, 4 months ago

leejohnson

The song was also heard in the 1978 NBC-TV "Ringo" special. Although Starr recorded new versions of several songs for the special, the released recording of "It Don't Come Easy" was eventually the version used. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It_Don%27t_Come_Easy

7 years, 4 months ago

spidra

It's embarrassing but I actually *have* gone up on my own lyrics on stage before...

7 years, 4 months ago

florencevibert

PERFECT!

7 years, 4 months ago

anagog

This always sends shivers down my spine - excellent choice!

7 years, 4 months ago

lynn200

dear ol Ringo....

7 years, 4 months ago

azche24

i always loved him as a drummer and a singer - reason enough to fall in long term relationship with Concert for Bangladesh - which featured some fine stuff, marvellous Jim Keltner on drums and a pretty stoned Eric Clapton